Tea Before Victoria

We are all very familiar with the concept of Afternoon Tea as a very agreeable social event. Before this mini-meal was conceived in the 1840s the role of tea was very different and this talk explains the social and legal changes which had to take place during the 17th and 18th centuries before tea took its place as Britain’s national drink.

This is the first of three talks in the Autumn Potpourri Talks Series. The other talks take place on 28th November and 12th December.You may book tickets for individual events or for all three talks in the series for a reduced price.  

To book

Pre-booking is required, because the event link will be sent in advance.                             

To join this talk, you will need a computer device with speakers. Ideally, also a webcam and microphone. You also need to be able to access the internet from it. First-time users of Zoom, will be asked to download a small piece of software, which will be sent in advance.                                                                                                                              

To book – scroll down.

Book Event

Member
£4
Available Tickets: 45

For members of Berkshire Family History Society

The "Member" ticket is sold out. You can try another ticket or another date.
Non-Member
£5
Available Tickets: 45

For non-members of Berkshire Family History Society

The "Non-Member" ticket is sold out. You can try another ticket or another date.
Total: 0

Date

Thu 24 Oct

Time

14:00 - 15:15

Tickets

£5.00

Location

Webinar
Webinar
Zoom Video Conference
Website
https://berksfhs.org
Category

Organiser

The Centre - Berkshire FHS
Email
booking@berksfhs.org.uk
Website
https://berksfhs.org/branches/
Book Now!

Speaker

  • Joy Pibworth
    Joy Pibworth

    Joy has always been fascinated by history and is particularly interested in the history of the towns and villages of the former North Berkshire (now the Vale of the White Horse) and the history of Reading pre 1837. She is a long-standing member of several local history societies. Joy has been a Janeite (Jane Austen fan) since her school days and is particularly interested in the life and times of Jane and her immediate family.