Windsor Castle 1100 – 1700 – postponed

Update 25 March 2020: Due to the coronavirus Covid-19 pandemic, this talk has been postponed until a later date. All booked attendees will be contacted in the next few days to arrange a full refund of their ticket monies. If you haven’t heard from us by 27th March, please check your SPAM box and then email . We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause. 

Discover how this most famous of English castles, home to 39 reigning monarchs, developed from its earliest days, in the reign of William the Conqueror, through its emergence as an iconic statement of medieval royal power, widely copied throughout Europe in the fourteenth century, to its almost complete abandonment in the late sixteenth. Windsor Castle has been the setting for some of the most beautiful and expensive architectural achievements, yet at the same time it was designed to function as a practical arm of government; layers of history that compose the structure as it can be seen today.

This is the first in a series of five talks on the theme of “Royalty”. The other talks take place on: 23rd April, 7th and 21st May, and 6th June. You may purchase tickets for individual events or for all five talks in the series for the reduced price of four. Most talks are on a Thursday afternoon, the final being on a Saturday and starting at the slightly earlier time of 12 noon. 

The ticket price includes tea/coffee and cake after the talk. Advance booking is highly recommended but you can pay on the door (subject to availability).

Date

09 Apr 2020

Time

14:00 - 16:00

Cost

£5.00
The Centre for Heritage & Family History

Location

The Centre for Heritage & Family History
2nd Floor, Reading Central Library, Abbey Square, Reading, Berkshire, RG1 3BQ
Category

Speakers

  • Dr David Lewis
    Dr David Lewis

    David has lived and worked in Windsor for the past 25 years. He completed his MA in medieval history at Royal Holloway, University of London, specialising in the history of medieval London and in 2006 a PhD on Windsor in the high Middle Ages. He was elected a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 2017. His post-doctoral work has been carried out in conjunction with the Historic Towns Trust, resulting in the publication of volume IV in their series of town studies, ‘Windsor and Eton’, covering the period c.900-1870.

    Since 2006, David has published a number of articles on aspects of Windsor’s history, including the Castle’s 16th century water conduit, the Medieval hospital of St Peter, the history of Old Windsor, the relationship between the medieval college of St George’s and the town, the history of prostitution in Windsor and most recently, ‘Windsor’s late medieval Fraternity of the Holy Trinity’, published in The Local Historian, July 2019. He is currently writing a history of medieval Eton and Windsor.

    David is a frequent contributor to BBC radio Berkshire on Windsor and Eton history, and regularly talks at local history groups and at academic conferences.

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Berkshire Family History Society works to meet the needs of those researching their ancestry across the UK and overseas – as well as those looking for former relatives in historic Berkshire.  You do not need to be a member to benefit.

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